Questions about going solar?

Let us answer them for you so you can start soaking up the sun.
  • How much do solar panels cost?

    Solar panel costs can vary from $18,000 to $20,000* for a standard system if you buy it outright. The good news is many companies offer several ways to get solar energy with little to nothing upfront and you can actual save on your energy costs.

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  • What if I want to sell my home?

    Even if you’re not planning on staying in your current home for 20 years, it doesn’t mean you can’t go solar. We make moving simple.

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  • What factors go into determining the perfect solar installation for my home?

    It truly depends on your home. Our team prides itself in determining and engineering the perfect solar fit. Here are some factors we use to determine your specific solar solution:

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  • What are the steps to going solar?

    We like to break the process of going solar into eight simple steps. This starts with your initial phone call with one of our solar specialists and ends with solar panels on your roof.

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  • How does weather affect my solar power production?

    Contrary to popular belief, Mother Nature doesn’t play a huge role in solar production. Take a look below at how solar panels work in different weather scenarios.

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  • Solar panels require a tracking system to follow the angle of the sun

    Fact: Though tracking mechanisms can provide efficiency gains for your solar panel system, they typically do not increase efficiency enough to justify the additional expense and maintenance of moving parts in residential situations.

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  • Solar will look ugly on my roof.

    Fact: In the last 10 years, there’s been a growing awareness of how smart renewable energy is from both environmental and economic perspective. So solar panels are finally coming into their own and being regarded as an enhancement instead of an eyesore.

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  • When the power goes out, my home is still powered

    Fact: When the power goes out, grid-tied systems go out too. That’s because it’s not safe to be pushing electricity back out onto the wires while workers may be trying to fix the problem.

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  • Solar is still so expensive that it will never be able to pay for itself

    Fact: Many customers notice excellent savings when they go solar. Furthermore, they enjoy the price predictability throughout their lease. Modern financing options have all but eliminated the barrier to entry for solar, so many households are now able to go solar for little to no money down.

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  • Solar panels will cause my roof to leak, deteriorate, or collapse

    Fact: Solar panels actually protect and preserve the portion of the roof they cover. Plus, most solar panels are not attached directly to the roof itself, but rather to a mounted railing system.

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  • Solar panels require maintenance

    Fact: Solar panels have no moving parts and do not require regular maintenance. Typically, we recommend hosing them off once a year or so, but many panel owners actually never clean the panels and instead rely on the rain to do the job for them.

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  • I will have an excess of energy that will go unused and will be wasted

    Fact: Nearly all modern solar panel systems are connected to the conventional electricity grid. When this happens, your meter spins backwards and your utility company credits you for that power.

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  • Solar doesn’t work in cool, cloudy, or foggy climates.

    Fact: Solar panels work great in ambient light and will produce significant energy in the fog or on overcast days. In fact, solar panels are almost equally as efficient at cooler temperatures than hot ones.

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  • Solar will get more efficient, so I should wait

    Fact: We’re still using the same solar technology we did back in the 1960’s. Since then, solar has become only moderately more efficient (unlike computers or cellphones which experience dramatic improvements in short periods of time). When panels become more efficient, it simply means you wouldn’t need as many, because they’re better at converting.

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  • Watt

    A watt is a unit of power, and power is the rate at which energy is produced, implemented or consumed. Watts are a measure of electrical flow from one device to another.

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  • Solar Photovoltaic (PV)

    Photovoltaic (PV) devices, such as solar panels, take sunlight and turn it into electricity that you can use in your home. It was made from silicon, a material derived from sand that is naturally photovoltaic.

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  • Solar Cell

    A solar cell is a device that converts sunlight into electricity using certain materials with semiconducting properties, like silicon. These materials use the “photovoltaic effect.” That means that when light hits a material like silicon, it knocks tiny electrons loose; when those electrons start to flow, that produces electricity.

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  • Solar Inverters

    A solar inverter converts the electricity from your solar panels into power that can be used by the plugs in your house for your TV, computer, and other wired products. Panels can’t create AC power by themselves; they need the helping hand of a solar inverter.

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  • Types of Solar Panels

    Monocrystalline Silicon (Single Silicon)

    Right now, these are the most efficient types of solar panels. When sunlight hits these panels, more of it turns into electricity than the other types below. You can tell if you have a monocrystalline solar panel by its square-ish cells.

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  • Solar Panels

    Solar panels are devices that turn sunlight into electricity. They’re made up of many smaller solar cells connected together; each cell generates electricity when sunlight hits it, and then that power flows into an inverter and finally into your house. Because each panel only creates a certain amount of energy, solar panels are typically grouped together into an array.